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Sebastiane, Derek Jarman, 1976.

Sebastiane, Derek Jarman, 1976.

(Kaynak: peterberries, sacredhorror gönderdi)

Anonim murmured, « i find you formidably attractive »

i live a rather fucking lonesome life for a human being whose appearance is apparently alluring to scores of strangers
coat your lips in hemlock oil and kiss me hard 


David Sims for Visionaire N° 40: Roses

David Sims for Visionaire N° 40: Roses

(Kaynak: ancient-serpent)


The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1972.

The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1972.

(Kaynak: infinitetext, customainame-deactivated2013100 gönderdi)

Apparently Arab scholars, when speaking of the text, use this admirable expression: the certain body. What body? We have several of them; the body of anatomists and physiologists, the one science sees or discusses: this is the text of grammarians, critics, commentators, philologists (the pheno-text). But we also have a body of bliss consisting solely of erotic relations, utterly distinct from the first body: it is another contour, another nomination; thus with the text: it is no more than the fires of language. …Does the text have human form, is it a figure, an anagram of the body? Yes, but of our erotic body. The pleasure of the text is irreducible to physiological need. The pleasure of the text is that moment when my body pursues its own ideas — for my body does not have the same ideas I do. — ROLAND BARTHES, Le Plaisir du texte.

(Kaynak: onegirlrhumba, golodomor gönderdi)

Hamburger Lady, Throbbing Gristle.

(bangst gönderdi)


Kimono Nº 2, Eikoh Hosoe, 1963.

Kimono Nº 2, Eikoh Hosoe, 1963.

The need to go astray, to be destroyed, is an extremely private, distant, passionate, turbulent truth. — GEORGES BATAILLE

(Kaynak: freyjageist, ains0phaur gönderdi)


Aktion, Günter Brus, 1964.

Aktion, Günter Brus, 1964.

(osklivost gönderdi)

In the illusory babels of language, an artist might advance specifically to get lost, and to intoxicate himself in dizzying syntaxes, seeking odd intersections of meaning, strange corridors of history, unexpected echoes, unknown humors, or voids of knowledge…but this quest is risky, full of bottomless fictions and endless architectures and counter-architectures…at the end, if there is an end, are perhaps only meaningless reverberations. The following is a mirror structure built of macro and micro orders, reflections, critical laputas, and dangerous stairways of words, a shaky edifice of fictions that hangs over inverse syntactical arrangements…coherences that vanish into quasi-exactitudes and sublunary and translunary principles. Here language covers rather than “discovers” its sites and situations. Here language “closes” rather than “discloses” doors to utilitarian interpretations and explanations. The language of the artists and critics referred to in this article becomes paradigmatic reflections in a looking-glass babel that is fabricated according to Pascal’s remark, “Nature is an infinite sphere whose center is everywhere and whose circumference is nowhere.”  ROBERT SMITHSON, A Museum of Language in the Vicinity of Art.

(Kaynak: toniiu)


I could no longer play I could not play by instinct, Francesca Woodman, 1977.

I could no longer play I could not play by instinct, Francesca Woodman, 1977.

(sierpien gönderdi)


Knife made for Emperor Jaranghir, Mughal India, 1621."At dawn a tremendous noise arose in the east. It was so terrifying that it nearly frightened the inhabitants out of their skins. Then, in the midst of tumultuous noise, something bright fell to the earth from above….” — the Jahangirnama (1605-24). Thus did Emperor Jahangir describe a meteor that landed within his kingdom in April 1621. His fascination with unusual natural events—and his power to harness their aura—is revealed by this dagger’s blade, forged from the glittering meteorite. Jahangir further noted that the blade “cut beautifully, as well as the very best swords.”

Knife made for Emperor Jaranghir, Mughal India, 1621.
"At dawn a tremendous noise arose in the east. It was so terrifying that it nearly frightened the inhabitants out of their skins. Then, in the midst of tumultuous noise, something bright fell to the earth from above….” — the Jahangirnama (1605-24). Thus did Emperor Jahangir describe a meteor that landed within his kingdom in April 1621. His fascination with unusual natural events—and his power to harness their aura—is revealed by this dagger’s blade, forged from the glittering meteorite. Jahangir further noted that the blade “cut beautifully, as well as the very best swords.”

(Kaynak: omgthatartifact)


Jarboe

Jarboe

(Kaynak: myrrhmarchive, bitethebolster gönderdi)

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